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Mon
19
May '14

Wolverine Packing Company, a Detroit, Mich. establishment, is recalling approximately 1.8 million pounds of ground beef products that may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/recalls-and-public-health-alerts/recall-case-archive/archive/2014/recall-030-2014

Michigan Firm Recalls Ground Beef Products Due To Possible E. Coli O157:H7

Class I Recall 030-2014
Health Risk: High May 19, 2014

Congressional and Public Affairs  Lauren Kotwicki  (202) 720-9113

 

EDITOR’S NOTE added on May 19, 2014: Upon further investigation, FSIS now believes the product was sent to distribution centers nationwide.

 

WASHINGTON, May, 19, 2014 – Wolverine Packing Company, a Detroit, Mich. establishment, is recalling approximately 1.8 million pounds of ground beef products that may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The ground beef products were produced between March 31, 2014 and April 18, 2014. For a full list of products that were recalled please see the attached document.

The products subject to recall bear the establishment number “EST. 2574B” and will have a production date code in the format “Packing Nos: MM DD 14” between “03 31 14” and “04 18 14.” These products were shipped to distributors for restaurant and retail use nationwide. There was no distribution of the products to the Department of Defense, the National School Lunch Program or catalog/internet sales.

Factors that can contribute to the size of the recall include potential contamination of additional products due to a lack of microbiological independence between lots in a production day, as well as a deficiency in supportive record-keeping by distributors.

FSIS was notified of E. coli O157:H7 illnesses on May 12, 2014. Working in conjunction with public health partners from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), FSIS determined through a traceback investigation that there is a link between the ground beef products from Wolverine Packing Company and this illness cluster. Based on epidemiological and traceback investigations, 11 case-patients have been identified in 4 states with illness onset dates ranging from April 22, 2014 to May 2, 2014. Additional information may be found on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website, http://www.cdc.gov/ecoli/2014/O157H7-05-14/index.html. FSIS continues to work with our state and federal public health partners on this investigation and provide updated information as it becomes available.

E. coli O157:H7 is a potentially deadly bacterium that can cause dehydration, bloody diarrhea and abdominal cramps 2–8 days (3–4 days, on average) after exposure the organism. While most people recover within a week, some develop a type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). This condition can occur among persons of any age but is most common in children under 5-years old and older adults. It is marked by easy bruising, pallor, and decreased urine output. Persons who experience these symptoms should seek emergency medical care immediately.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

FSIS advises all consumers to safely prepare their raw meat products, including fresh and frozen, and only consume ground beef that has been cooked to a temperature of 160° F. The only way to confirm that ground beef is cooked to a temperature high enough to kill harmful bacteria is to use a food thermometer that measures internal temperature, http://1.usa.gov/1cDxcDQ.

Media with questions regarding the recall can contact Chuck Sanger, Spokesperson, Wolverine Packing Company, at  (262) 563-5118 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting (262) 563-5118 FREE  end_of_the_skype_highlighting  and consumers can call  (800) 521-1390 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting (800) 521-1390 FREE  end_of_the_skype_highlighting .Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline  1-888-MPHotline begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 1-888-MPHotline FREE  end_of_the_skype_highlighting  ( 1-888-674-6854 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 1-888-674-6854 FREE  end_of_the_skype_highlighting ) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

 

PREPARING PRODUCT FOR SAFE CONSUMPTIONUSDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHOTLINE begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 1-888-MPHOTLINE FREE  end_of_the_skype_highlighting  or visit www.fsis.usda.gov

Wash hands with warm, soapy water for at least 20 seconds before and after handling raw meat and poultry. Wash cutting boards, dishes and utensils with hot, soapy water. Immediately clean spills.

Keep raw meat, fish and poultry away from other food that will not be cooked. Use separate cutting boards for raw meat, poultry and egg products and cooked foods.

Color is NOT a reliable indicator that meat has been cooked to a temperature high enough to kill harmful bacteria.

The only way to be sure the meat or poultry is cooked to a high enough temperature to kill harmful bacteria is to use a thermometer to measure the internal temperature.

  • Fish: 145°F
  • Beef, pork, lamb chops/steaks/roasts: 145°F with a three minute rest time
  • Ground meat: 160°F
  • Poultry: 165°F
  • Hot dogs: 160°F or steaming hot

Refrigerate raw meat and poultry within two hours after purchase or one hour if temperatures exceed 90º F. Refrigerate cooked meat and poultry within two hours after cooking.

 

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

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Fri
6
Dec '13

“Tiger meat”, “cannibal sandwiches”, & E. coli

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6248a4.htm

Notes from the Field: Escherichia coli O157:H7 Outbreak Associated with Seasonal Consumption of Raw Ground Beef — Wisconsin, December 2012–January 2013

Weekly

December 6, 2013 / 62(48);987-987

On January 8, 2013, the Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene notified the Wisconsin Division of Public Health (WDPH) of two patients with Escherichia coli O157:H7 clinical isolates that had indistinguishable, but commonly identified, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns. The two patients were interviewed by local health departments within 1 day of the initial report. They revealed that they had eaten raw ground beef purchased from the same meat market and served as “tiger meat” or “cannibal sandwiches.” In this dish, the raw ground beef typically is served on rye bread or crackers with onions and is a traditional winter holiday specialty in certain regions of the upper Midwest. Five agencies (the Watertown Department of Health; WDPH; Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection; U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service; and CDC) investigated to determine the magnitude of the outbreak, prevent additional infections, and better understand raw ground beef consumption.

The market provided a list of 62 persons who preordered raw ground beef for the 2012 winter holiday season. A case-finding and knowledge-attitudes-practices questionnaire was administered to 53 of 62 persons included on that list, plus nine additional household members, and two persons with reported illness. A probable case was defined as diarrhea with onset occurring in a person who had been exposed in the previous 10 days to raw ground beef sold by the market during December 22, 2012–January 4, 2013. A confirmed case was an illness meeting the probable case definition in a person from whose stool E. coli O157:H7 with PFGE and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) patterns indistinguishable from those of the outbreak strain had been isolated.

Among 17 patients (four with confirmed and 13 with probable cases), 13 were female, and median age was 46 years (range: 1–82 years). Eight (47%) had received outpatient medical care; no hospitalizations or deaths occurred. Fourteen patients reported eating raw ground beef served as tiger meat or cannibal sandwiches during the holiday, and three had exposure to raw ground beef from cross-contamination. The market voluntarily recalled 2,532 pounds (1,148 kg) of raw ground beef on January 15, 2013. E. coli O157:H7 isolates from four patients and two raw ground beef samples (one in original packaging) collected from two households had PFGE and MLVA patterns indistinguishable from the outbreak strain.

Among respondents to the questionnaire, 55 (98%) of 56 reported consuming raw ground beef only during special occasions or winter holidays. A total of 53 (91%) of 58 were aware that consuming raw ground beef could cause illness, but only 17 (41%) of 42 thought that illness could be severe. Six of 15 (40%) patients and 28 (70%) of 40 non-ill persons said they intended to eat raw ground beef in the future.

In this same region of Wisconsin, raw ground beef served as tiger meat was associated with large (more than 50 cases) outbreaks of foodborne illness reported to WDPH during 1972, 1978, and 1994 (13). Despite ongoing outreach efforts addressing the dangers associated with consuming undercooked or raw ground beef, this regional holiday tradition continues to be associated with outbreaks.

Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence implicated raw ground beef from the market as the source of E. coli O157:H7 in this outbreak. The rapid public health response resulted in timely case detection and likely prevention of additional cases through product recall.

Discouraging this tradition requires regional targeted consumer and retailer education to ensure understanding of the potential for severe illness associated with raw ground beef consumption. Retailers in this region should be encouraged to directly discourage their customers from consuming raw ground beef. To prevent illness, ground beef should be cooked to an internal temperature of 160°F (71°C), as measured with a food thermometer, before consumption.

References

  1. CDC. Outbreak of Salmonella serotype Typhimurim infection associated with eating raw ground beef—Wisconsin, 1994. MMWR 1995;44:905–9.
  2. Roels TH, Frazak PA, Kazmierczak JJ, et al. Incomplete sanitation of a meat grinder and ingestion of raw ground beef: contributing factors to a large outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium infection. Epidemiol Infect 1997;119:127–34.
  3. CDC. Salmonella Typhimurium—Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan. MMWR 1972;21:411,416.

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Wed
14
Aug '13

What Common Kitchen Items Harbor E. coli, Salmonella, Listeria, Yeast and Mold? Oh, my!

http://www.nsf.org/business/newsroom/press_releases/press_release.asp?p_id=29690

NSF International’s 2013 Household Germ Study Finds Common Kitchen Items Harbor E. coli, Salmonella, Listeria, Yeast and Mold

NSF International offers tips on proper cleaning and care of home appliances and kitchen items

 

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (August 7, 2013) — NSF International’s Applied Research Center (ARC), which conducts original research and development projects for academia, industry, and regulatory bodies to further public health and safety, has released the 2013 NSF International Household Germ Study, revealing that many common kitchen items harbor unsafe levels of E. coli, Salmonella, Listeria, yeast and mold.

Scientists at NSF International, a global public health and safety organization, point to a number of contributing factors, including improper food storage, handling, preparation and cleaning, which may help explain why more than 20 percent of foodborne illness outbreaks result from food consumed in the home.*

The NSF microbiologists conducting the germ study analyzed 14 common kitchen items for the presence of four different types of microorganisms: E. coli, Salmonella, yeast and mold, and Listeria. The study found that many of these common kitchen appliances and tools used to prepare food do indeed harbor pathogens that can cause foodborne illness:

  • Refrigerator vegetable compartment: Salmonella, Listeria, yeast and mold
  • Refrigerator meat compartment: Salmonella, E. coli, yeast and mold
  • Blender gasket: Salmonella, E. coli, yeast and mold
  • Can opener: Salmonella, E. coli, yeast and mold
  • Rubber spatula: E. coli, yeast and mold
  • Food storage container with rubber seal: Salmonella, yeast and mold

It is NSF’s hope that the information gained from this study will further underscore the importance of properly maintaining and cleaning these items, especially those that we don’t always think to disassemble and clean such as the blender gasket.

“Consumers are increasingly concerned about the safety and quality of their food but often don’t realize that they may be the cause of foodborne illness in their own homes, due to improper cleaning of kitchenware and appliances. As a NSF microbiologist, I was surprised to learn that most people know what items carry germs, but they still didn’t clean them properly. Products that come in direct contact with food must be designed and maintained properly to prevent germ growth. The performance, quality, material safety and cleanability of home products all are important for food safety,” said Rob Donofrio, Ph.D., Director of NSF International’s Applied Research Center.

NSF Home Product Certification Program“Young children, the elderly and those with weakened immune systems are particularly vulnerable to foodborne illness,” said Dr. Donofrio. “Concerned consumers can look for the NSF Home Product Certification mark on products to ensure items can be cleaned correctly when following the manufacturer’s instructions to prevent harboring germs.”

Perception vs. Reality: Are We Unknowingly Making Ourselves and Others Sick?
Importantly, while germ study volunteers correctly identified items that they thought would harbor the most germs, they are not always cleaning them sufficiently to prevent illness. The following is a list of the items that were perceived by volunteers to be the “germiest” versus the actual “germiest” items (ranked from highest to lowest in germ count):

Perceived:
1. Microwave keypad
2. Can opener
3. Refrigerator meat compartment
4. Refrigerator vegetable compartment
5. Flatware storage tray
6. Knife block
7. Pizza cutter
8. Rubber spatula
9. Refrigerator insulating seal
10. Ice dispenser
Reality:
1. Refrigerator water dispenser
2. Rubber spatula
3. Blender
4. Refrigerator vegetable compartment
5. Refrigerator ice dispenser
6. Refrigerator meat compartment
7. Knife block
8. Food storage container with rubber seal
9. Can opener
10. Refrigerator insulating seal

Germs found on these everyday kitchen appliances and tools can easily come in direct contact with food, especially raw produce, meat, poultry, seafood and ready-to-eat food. The study identified where the germs are located in the average home kitchen and, more importantly, how people can better protect against foodborne illness. The key is to be aware of where the ‘hot spots’ are in your home and clean correctly and regularly to help prevent germ accumulation.

“What’s important to remember is the science behind the study. Germs exist everywhere and while not all germs are ‘bad,’ our goal is to educate the public about how they can help keep their families healthy,” said Dr. Donofrio.

For more information on NSF International’s Applied Research Center, visit: www.nsf.org/info/ARC.

For tips on how to keep kitchen appliances and tools clean, please visit: http://www.nsf.org/consumer/home_and_family/germs_kitchen_2013.asp.

Media Contact: To schedule an interview with a NSF expert, contact Greta Houlahan at houlahan@nsf.org or 734-913-5723.

###

Household Germ Study Methodology: The NSF International 2013 Household Germ Study was conducted by microbiologists at NSF International’s Applied Research Center in Ann Arbor, Mich., from July to October 2012, with results published in March 2013. Swab kits, which included a swab for each of the 14 kitchen items to be analyzed, were provided to 20 volunteer families throughout the Ann Arbor area. The scientific testing swab was saturated with a sterile medium with a neutralizer that helps pick up germs from surfaces. Volunteers were instructed to wear gloves and rub the wet swab tip in a turning motion across a designated surface area of each of the 14 items. They then placed the swab with the sample back into the swab container without touching the tip to anything else to ensure an accurate sample. These samples were then analyzed by NSF microbiologists for the presence of microorganisms such as E. coli, yeast and mold, Salmonella and Listeria species.

About NSF International: NSF International is a global independent public health and safety organization that helps protect consumers by certifying products and writing standards for food, water, dietary supplements and consumer goods to minimize adverse health effects and protect the environment. NSF International’s Applied Research Center (ARC) provides original research and custom R&D services for the water, food, pharma, consumer products and sustainability industries. ARC establishes strategic partnerships with academia, industry and regulatory bodies for research and development projects geared to furthering public health.

The NSF Consumer Products Division builds on NSF International’s expertise in national standards and protocol development, testing and certification to help ensure the safety, performance and quality of consumer products and appliances used in and around the home. NSF has worked to help ensure the safe design and cleaning of food equipment and appliances used in food preparation since the 1940s, focusing on equipment used in restaurants. NSF’s Home Product Certification Program began in 2012, addressing kitchen appliances and tools used in the home. In addition to evaluating performance, durability and materials, the program evaluates manufacturers’ cleaning instructions to help prevent equipment from harboring pathogens that can cause foodborne illness.

* Source: Centers for Disease, Control and Prevention: Tracking and Reporting Food Disease Outbreaks, http://www.cdc.gov/features/dsfoodborneoutbreaks/

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Sat
10
Aug '13

12,600 pounds of boneless veal products recalled because they may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7, E. coli O145 and E. coli O45

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/recalls-and-public-health-alerts/recall-case-archive/archive/2013/recall-045-2013-release

New York Firm Recalls Boneless Veal Products Due To Possible E. Coli Contamination

Class I Recall 045-2013
Health Risk: High Aug 9, 2013
 

Congressional and Public Affairs
Richard J. McIntire
(202)720-9113

 Get your MPI Directory Android App!

WASHINGTON, August 9, 2013 – United Processing LLC, a New York Mills, NY firm, is recalling approximately 12,600 pounds of boneless veal products because they may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7, E. coli O145 and E. coli O45 the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The following products are subject to FSIS recall:

  • 60-lb. boxes of boneless veal

The products subject to recall bear the establishment number “M- 27450” inside the USDA mark of inspection on a generic box label. The products were produced on June 17, 18, 24, 28 and 29, 2013 then distributed to wholesalers in New York and California for further processing.

FSIS became aware of the problem during inspection program personnel review. The firm sampled the product per their food safety program, and inadvertently shipped the product into commerce.

FSIS and the company have received no reports of illnesses associated with consumption of these products.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to ensure that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at: www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Many clinical laboratories do not test for non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), such as STEC O26, O103, O45, O111, O121 or O145 because it is harder to identify. Infections with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli can result in dehydration, bloody diarrhea and abdominal cramps 2-8 days (3-4 days, on average) after exposure to the organism. While most people recover within a week, some develop a type of kidney failure called Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS). This condition can occur among persons of any age but is most common in children under 5 and older adults. Symptoms of HUS may include fever, abdominal pain, pale skin tone, fatigue, small, unexplained bruises or bleeding from the nose and mouth, decreased urination, and swelling. Persons who experience these symptoms should seek emergency medical care immediately.

Consumers and media with questions regarding the recall should contact the company’s plant manager Jon Gorea at (315) 768-7100, ext. 228.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. “Ask Karen” live chat services are available Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. ET. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/recalls-and-public-health-alerts/report-a-problem-with-food.

 
 

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

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Fri
5
Apr '13

Additional Frozen Mini Meals And Other Snack Products Recalled Due To Possible E. Coli O121 Contamination

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/News_&_Events/Recall_025_2013_Expanded/index.asp

New York Firm Recalls Additional Frozen Mini Meals And Other Snack Products Due To Possible E. Coli O121 Contamination
Congressional and Public Affairs
(202) 720-9113
Richard J. McIntire

For FDA inquiries, contact:
Patricia El-Hinnawy (301) 796-4763

Editor’s Note April 4, 2013: Details of this recall were updated April 4, 2013 to reflect the approximate amounts, additional products and slight changes in health investigation information.

WASHINGTON, Apr. 4, 2013 – Rich Products Corporation, a Buffalo, N.Y. firm, is expanding its recall of various heat treated, not fully cooked frozen mini meals and snack items to more than 10.5 million pounds because they may be contaminated with E. coli O121, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. The expanded recall covers all products produced at the company’s Waycross, Ga. plant with “Best by” dates ranging from January 1, 2013 to September 29, 2014.

The following FSIS-regulated products are subject to the expanded recall:

Retail products–

  • 21-oz. bags of Farm Rich mini bacon cheeseburgers, UPC code 0 41322 35622 2
  • 1-lb. bags of Schwan’s mini meatball sandwiches, UPC code 0 72180 55312 6
  • 18-oz. bags of Farm Rich mini quesadillas, UPC code 0 41322 35611 6, case code 1 00 41322 35631 1
  • 18-oz. bags of Farm Rich mini quesadillas, UPC code 0 41322 35635 2, case code 1 00 41322 35635 9
  • 20-oz. bags of Farm Rich mini quesadillas, UPC code 0 41322 35611 6, case code 1 00 41322 35611 3
  • 21-oz. bags of Farm Rich Philly Cheese Steaks, UPC code 0 41322 35618 5, case code 1 00 41322 35618 2

Foodservice products–

  • 25-lb. cases containing 2.5-lb. foodservice paks of BBQ Chicken Sandwich Melt, UPC code 00041322653024, Product code 65302
  • 25-lb. cases containing 2.5-lb. foodservice paks of Meatball Marinara Sandwich Melt, UPC code 00041322653031, Product 65303
  • 25-lb. cases containing 2.5-lb. foodservice paks of Farm Rich Whole Grain Rich Pepperoni Pizzata, UPC code 10041322652321, Product code 65232
  • 27-lb. cases containing 3-lb. foodservice paks of Farm Rich Turkey Pizzata, UPC code 00041322652348, Product code 65234
  • 24.75-lb. foodservice paks of Pepperoni Pizzata, UPC code 00041322652829 , Product code 65282
  • 25.7-lb. cases of 2.57-lb. foodservice paks of Farm Rich Handheld Stuffed Pepperoni Pleezer, UPC code 10041322652925, Product code 65292

Each product package above contains the establishment number “EST. 27232″ or “P-27233″ inside the USDA mark of inspection.

The following FDA-regulated products are subject to the expanded recall. FSIS is issuing this news release to make the public aware that these products are also considered potentially adulterated and should be properly discarded or destroyed.

Retail products–

  • 44-oz. cartons of Farm Rich in a pizzeria style crust, UPC code 0 41322 32521 1
  • 22-oz. bags of Farm Rich mozzarella bites in a pizzeria style crust, UPC code 0 4132237813 2
  • 22-oz. bags of Farm Rich mozzarella bites in a pizzeria style crust, UPC code 0 72180610008 9
  • 22-oz. bags of Farm Rich mozzarella bites in a pizzeria style crust, UPC code 0 4132237443 1
  • 22-oz. cartons of Farm Rich mozzarella bites in a pizzeria style crust, UPC code 0 4132280435 5
  • 7-oz. cartons of Farm Rich mozzarella bites in a pizzeria style crust, UPC code 0 4132237691 3
  • 2-lb. cartoons of Farm Rich mozzarella bites in a pizzeria style crust, UPC code 04132237455 4

Foodservice products–

  • 5-lb. foodservice paks of Farm Rich Better For You Pizza Dipper, UPC code 10041322652338
  • 25-lb. foodservice paks of Farm Rich Stuffed Crust Pizza Dippers, UPC code 10041322652680
  • 2.7-lb. foodservice paks of Farm Rich Stuffed Crust Pizza Dippers, UPC code 10041322652659
  • 2.7-lb. foodservice paks of Farm Rich Better For You Pizza Dipper, UPC code 00041322652782

The following products are subject to the FSIS recall issued March 28:

  • 7.2-oz. cartons of Farm Rich mini pizza slices with cheese pepperoni and sauce in pizza dough, UPC code 041322376909
  • 22-oz. cartons of Farm Rich mini pizza slices with cheese pepperoni and sauce in pizza dough, UPC code 041322356437
  • 18-oz. bags of Farm Rich mini quesadillas with cheese, grilled white meat chicken in a crispy crust, UPC code 041322356352
  • 21-oz. bags of Farm Rich philly cheese steaks with cheese, beef & onions in a crispy crust, UPC code 041322356345

Each product package above contains the establishment number “EST. 27232″ or “P-27233″ inside the USDA mark of inspection.

In addition, the following products, which fall under FDA jurisdiction, were also recalled March 28. FSIS is issuing this news release to make the public aware that these products are also considered potentially adulterated and should be properly discarded or destroyed.

  • 22-oz. cartons of Farm Rich mozzarella bites in a pizzeria style crust, UPC code 041322374431
  • 7-oz. cartons of Farm Rich mozzarella bites in a pizzeria style crust, UPC code 041322376916
  • 22-oz. bags of Market Day Mozzarella Bites, UPC code 041322804358

The products subject to recall were produced between July 1, 2011 and March 29, 2013 then distributed for retail or restaurant sale nationwide. FSIS and the establishment are concerned that some product may be present in household freezers.

FSIS was notified of a multistate investigation of E. coli O121 illnesses on March 19, 2013. Food samples were collected from an ill individual in New York as part of this investigation, and tested by the New York State Department of Health Wadsworth Laboratory. At present, the outbreak includes 24 cases in 15 states that led to seven hospitalizations and one case of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS), a type of kidney failure. A sample of a Farm Rich frozen chicken mini quesadilla product from a New York case tested positive for the outbreak strain of E. coli O121. Additionally, a sample of leftover Farm Rich mini pepperoni pizza slices product from a Texas case tested positive for the same strain, confirmed by FSIS lab technicians. Ten cases in Michigan, Mississippi, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Virginia report consuming Farm Rich products. FSIS is continuing to work with federal and state public health partners on this investigation, including the New York State Department of Health, New York State Department of Agriculture & Markets, Food and Drug Administration, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to ensure that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at:
www.fsis.usda.gov/FSIS_Recalls/
Open_Federal_Cases/index.asp
.

Infection with E. coli O121 can result in dehydration, bloody diarrhea and abdominal cramps 2-8 days (3-4 days, on average) after exposure to the organism. While most people recover within a week, some develop HUS. This condition can occur among persons of any age but is most common in children under 5-years old and older adults. Symptoms of HUS may include fever, abdominal pain, pale skin tone, fatigue, small, unexplained bruises or bleeding from the nose and mouth and decreased urination. Persons who experience these symptoms should seek emergency medical care immediately.

Consumers with questions regarding the recall should contact the company’s consumer line at (888) 220-5955 from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. EST Monday through Friday or visit the company website at www.farmrich.com. Media with questions regarding the recall should contact the company’s vice president of communications, Dwight Gram, at (716) 878-8749.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. “Ask Karen” live chat services are available Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. ET. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: www.fsis.usda.gov/FSIS_Recalls/
Problems_With_Food_Products/index.asp

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Wed
16
Jan '13

Wisconsin Firm Recalls Ground Beef Products Due to Possible E. Coli O157:H7 Contamination

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/News_&_Events/Recall_001_2013_Release/index.asp

Wisconsin Firm Recalls Ground Beef Products Due to Possible E. Coli O157:H7 Contamination
Recall Release CLASS I RECALL
FSIS-RC-001_2013 HEALTH RISK: HIGH

Congressional and Public Affairs
(202) 720-9113
Richard J. McIntire

WASHINGTON, January 15, 2013 – Glenn’s Market and Catering, a Watertown, WI establishment, is recalling approximately 2,532 pounds of raw ground beef products that may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

PREPARING GROUND BEEF FOR SAFE CONSUMPTION

Wash hands before and after handling raw meat with warm/hot (preferred) or cold soapy running water by rubbing hands together vigorously for at least 20 seconds. Also wash cutting boards, dishes and utensils with hot (preferred), soapy water and clean up any spills right away. The mechanical action of vigorous rubbing of hands and utensils/surfaces creates friction that helps to dislodge bacteria and viruses from hands and surfaces.

Additionally, warm/hot water helps to dissolve fats/foods, aiding in cleaning/microbe removal and can also assist in deactivation of pathogens. For more information on hand washing, go to http://www.cdc.gov/
handwashing
. If soapy water is not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Alcohol-based hand sanitizers can reduce the number of germs on hands in some situations. However, sanitizers do not eliminate all types of germs, including viruses.

Keep raw meat, fish and poultry away from other food that will not be thoroughly cooked. Use separate cutting boards for raw meat, poultry, and their juices and thoroughly cooked foods. Thoroughly cook ground meat such as beef to an internal temperature of 160° F, as measured with a food thermometer, before eating. Refrigerate raw meat and poultry within two hours after purchase (one hour if temperatures exceed 90° F). Refrigerate cooked meat and poultry within two hours after cooking.

The products subject to recall are:

  • Various size packages of Glenn’s Market ground round, ground chuck and ground beef sold between Dec. 22, 2012 and Jan. 4, 2013.

The products subject to recall were sold only at Glenn’s Market and Catering in Watertown, WI from the retail meat case.

FSIS was notified of an investigation of E. coli O157:H7 illnesses by the Wisconsin Division of Public Health on Jan. 10, 2013. Working in conjunction with the Wisconsin Division of Public Health, three case-patients with the outbreak strain have been identified in the state with illness onset dates ranging from Dec. 29, 2012 to Jan. 1, 2013. Among the three case-patients with available information, all three reported consuming raw ground round; two consumed product ground and purchased on Dec. 24, 2012; the third consumed product ground and purchased on Dec. 30, 2012 prior to illness onset. FSIS is continuing to work with the Watertown Department of Public Health, the Wisconsin Division of Public Health, the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on this investigation.

FSIS and the establishment are concerned that some product may be frozen and in shoppers’ freezers.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to ensure that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at: www.fsis.usda.gov/FSIS_Recalls/ Open_Federal_Cases/index.asp.

E. coli O157:H7 is a potentially deadly bacterium that can cause dehydration, bloody diarrhea and abdominal cramps 2-8 days (3-4 days, on average) after exposure to the organism. While most people recover within a week, some develop a type of kidney failure called HUS. This condition can occur among persons of any age but is most common in children under 5-years old and older adults. Symptoms of HUS may include fever, abdominal pain, pale skin tone, fatigue and irritability, small, unexplained bruises or bleeding from the nose and mouth, decreased urination, and swelling. Persons who experience these symptoms should seek emergency medical care immediately.

FSIS advises all consumers to safely prepare their raw meat products, including fresh and frozen, and only consume ground beef that has been cooked to a temperature of 160° F. The only way to confirm that ground beef is cooked to a temperature high enough to kill harmful bacteria is to use a food thermometer that measures internal temperature.

Consumers and media with questions regarding the recall should contact the company’s vice president, Jeff Roberts, at (920) 261-2226.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. “Ask Karen” live chat services are available Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. ET. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: www.fsis.usda.gov/FSIS_Recalls/
Problems_With_Food_Products/index.asp

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Tue
15
Jan '13

Canada: 2 additional cases of E. coli O157:H7 illness were confirmed in Ontario as part of this outbreak. This brings the total number of cases to 28.

http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/fs-sa/phn-asp/ecoli-0113-eng.php

Public Health Notice: E. coli O157:H7 illnesses in the Maritimes and Ontario

14 January 2013

Since our last update, 2 additional cases of E. coli O157:H7 illness were confirmed in Ontario as part of this outbreak. This brings the total number of cases to 28. These individuals became ill between late December and early January.

Lettuce has a short shelf life, therefore contaminated products are unlikely to still be available.

As a precaution, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is working with FreshPoint Inc. to recallExternal Link any remaining affected products. At this point, the source of contamination for the shredded lettuce has not been determined. The CFIA has traced the lettuce to its origin in California and has notified U.S. authorities of this finding. The CFIA is verifying that appropriate food safety controls were followed at each step of production, processing and distribution. Immediate action will be taken to ensure that any unsafe food is removed from the marketplace.

The Public Health Agency of Canada continues to lead the coordination of the investigation into this outbreak in close collaboration with its health and food safety partners. There are 6 cases in New Brunswick, 10 in Nova Scotia and 12 in Ontario. The majority of cases have recovered or are recovering. Additional cases of illness may be identified and linked to this outbreak in the future.

Products contaminated with E. coli O157 can pose a serious public health risk.

Status

Investigations into outbreaks of food-borne illness can be complex. Since early January 2013, the Agency has been leading a committee to investigate these illnesses that includes public health and food safety experts from the CFIA, Health Canada and Provincial Health Authorities. The committee meets regularly to share and review the latest information and determine what actions should be taken to protect Canadians.

The Public Health Agency of Canada, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and provincial health and food safety authorities will continue their investigation to determine if additional action is required to protect Canadians.

More information about the epidemiological investigation is also available.

 

Province / Territory Total confirmed cases
New Brunswick 6
Nova Scotia 10
Ontario 12
Total 28

E. coli O157 food-borne illnesses are not uncommon in Canada. In recent years, an average of about 440 cases of this type of E. coli infection was reported annually in Canada.

What you should do

Most strains of E. coli are harmless; however, some strains, such as E. coli O157:H7, can make people sick, causing severe stomach cramps, diarrhea and vomiting. Serious complications of an E. coli O157:H7 infection can include kidney failure.

If you think you are sick with an E. coli infection, consult a healthcare professional.

Symptoms of an E. coli O157:H7 infection

Like other foodborne illnesses, the symptoms of E. coli infection mainly involve the gut. Symptoms may vary from person to person; however, they often include:

  • severe stomach cramps;
  • diarrhea (often watery and may develop into bloody);
  • vomiting; and
  • fever (generally not very high – usually less than 38.5˚C/101˚F).

Symptoms usually last five to seven days.

Around 5 to 10 per cent of those who get sick from E. coli O157:H7 overall and about 15 per cent of young children and the elderly develop hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which can be fatal. Symptoms of HUS vary. Some people have seizures or strokes and some need blood transfusions and kidney dialysis. Others live with side effects such as permanent kidney damage.

Who is most at risk?

Infections can occur among people of all ages, however symptoms are likely to be more severe among the very young and the elderly. Pregnant women and people with weakened immune systems are also at high risk of developing serious complications.

How to protect yourself

Proper hygiene and safe food handling and preparation practices are key to preventing the spread of all foodborne illnesses, including E. coli.

Hand washing is one of the best ways to prevent the spread of foodborne illness.

Contaminated foods may look and smell normal. It is important to ensure that you wash your fruits and vegetables before eating them, and cook meat to a safe internal temperature.

General food safety

Everyone should practice these general food safety precautions at all times.

Additional information

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Sat
5
Jan '13

FDA propose two new food safety rules that will help prevent foodborne illness. If you don’t want E. coli burgers, be prepared to pay more for ground chuck.

http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm334156.htm?source=govdelivery

FDA NEWS RELEASE

For Immediate Release: Jan. 4, 2013
Media Inquiries: Shelly Burgess, 301-796-4651, shelly.burgess@fda.hhs.gov
Consumer Inquiries: 1-888-INFO-FDA

FDA proposes new food safety standards for foodborne illness prevention and produce safety

Public encouraged to comment on new proposals
 
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today proposed two new food safety rules that will help prevent foodborne illness. The proposed rules implement the landmark, bipartisan FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) and are available for public comment for the next 120 days. The FDA encourages Americans to review and comment on these important proposed rules.
 
The proposed rules build on significant strides made during the Obama Administration, including the first egg safety rule protecting consumers from Salmonella and stepped up testing for E. coli in beef as well as existing voluntary industry guidelines for food safety, which many producers, growers and others currently follow.
 
The rules follow extensive outreach by the FDA to the produce industry, the consumer community, other government agencies and the international community. Since January 2011, FDA staff have toured farms and facilities nationwide and participated in hundreds of meetings and presentations with global regulatory partners, industry stakeholders, consumer groups, farmers, state and local officials, and the research community.
 
“The FDA Food Safety Modernization Act is a common sense law that shifts the food safety focus from reactive to preventive,” said Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. “With the support of industry, consumer groups, and the bipartisan leadership in Congress, we are establishing a science-based, flexible system to better prevent foodborne illness and protect American families.”
 
The burden of foodborne illness in the United States is substantial. One in six Americans suffer from a foodborne illness every year. Of those, nearly 130,000 are hospitalized and 3,000 die from their illness. Preventing foodborne illnesses will improve public health, reduce medical costs, and avoid the costly disruptions of the food system caused by illness outbreaks and large-scale recalls.
 
These two FSMA rules are part of an integrated reform effort that focuses on prevention and addresses the safety of foods produced domestically and imported, with additional rules to be published shortly.
 
The first rule proposed today would require makers of food to be sold in the United States, whether produced at a foreign- or domestic-based facility, to develop a formal plan for preventing their food products from causing foodborne illness. The rule would also require them to have plans for correcting any problems that arise. The FDA seeks public comment on this proposal. The FDA is proposing that many food manufacturers be in compliance with the new preventive controls rules one year after the final rules are published in the Federal Register but small and very small businesses would be given additional time.
 
The FDA also seeks public comment on the second proposed rule released today, which proposes enforceable safety standards for the production and harvesting of produce on farms. This rule proposes science- and risk-based standards for the safe production and harvesting of fruits and vegetables. 
 
The FDA is proposing that larger farms be in compliance with most of the produce safety requirements 26 months after the final rule is published in the Federal Register. Small and very small farms would have additional time to comply, and all farms would have additional time to comply with certain requirements related to water quality. 
 
“The FDA knows that food safety, from farm to fork, requires partnership with industry, consumers, local, state and tribal governments, and our international trading partners,” said FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D. “Our proposed rules reflect the input we have received from these stakeholders and we look forward to working with the public as they review the proposed rules.”
 
Before issuing the two rules, the FDA conducted extensive outreach that included five federal public meetings and regional, state, and local meetings in 14 states across the country as well as making hundreds of presentations to ensure that the rules would be flexible enough to cover the diverse industries to be affected. The FDA also visited farms and facilities of varying sizes.
 
“We know one-size-fits-all rules won’t work,” said Michael R. Taylor, the FDA’s deputy commissioner for foods and veterinary medicine. “We’ve worked to develop proposed regulations that can be both effective and practical across today’s diverse food system.”
 
Additional rules to follow soon include new responsibilities for importers to verify that food products grown or processed overseas are as safe as domestically produced food and accreditation standards to strengthen the quality of third party food safety audits overseas. Improving oversight of imported food is an important goal of FSMA. Approximately 15 percent of the food consumed in the United States is imported, with much higher proportions in certain higher risk categories, such as produce. The FDA will also propose a preventive controls rule for animal food facilities, similar to the preventive controls rule proposed today for human food.  
 
The FDA plans to coordinate the comment periods on the major FSMA proposals as fully as possible to better enable public comment on how the rules can best work together to create an integrated, effective and efficient food safety system.
 
For more information:
 
The FDA, an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, protects the public health by assuring the safety, effectiveness, and security of human and veterinary drugs, vaccines and other biological products for human use, and medical devices. The agency also is responsible for the safety and security of our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, dietary supplements, products that give off electronic radiation, and for regulating tobacco products.
 
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Sat
27
Oct '12

119 confirmed cases of E. coli in Northern Ireland; linked to one restaurant.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-20043035

23 October 2012 Last updated at 12:58 ET

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Thu
18
Oct '12

Belfast: “Geraldine and her two daughters were both confirmed as having E. coli after eating in Flicks restaurant at Cityside Mall this month….”

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-19958572

17 October 2012 Last updated at 11:51 ET

 
“……The PHA said there are now 25 confirmed cases and 154 suspected cases of food poisoning following an investigation at Flicks restaurant at Cityside Mall.……

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