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May 25th, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP May 25, 2012 @ 9:57 am

FEMA: 5/25/12 SitRep

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May 25th, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 9:50 am

California Department of Public Health issues botulism warning.

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http://www.cdph.ca.gov/Pages/NR12-021.aspx

CDPH Warns Consumers Not To Eat “TASTE OF ROUX” Jarred Soups Because of Botulism Risk

Date: 5/24/2012 

Number: 12-021 

Contact: Anita Gore 916 440-7259 

SACRAMENTO 

California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Director Dr. Ron Chapman warned consumers today not to eat Taste of Roux, LLC jarred soups because they may have been improperly produced, making them susceptible to contamination with Clostridium Botulinum. Ingestion of botulism toxin from improperly processed jarred and canned foods may lead to serious illness and death. No illnesses have been linked to any of the affected products at this time.

Taste of Roux, LLC of Valley Village, California is voluntarily recalling the following varieties of jarred soups: Lentil, Black Bean, Tomato, Carrot Ginger, Vegetarian Chili, and Detox. The soups were sold under the Taste of Roux label and packaged in quart and pintglass jars with screw-on metal lids. The product labels do not include any coding or “use by” dates. Photographs of the affected packages can be found HERE.

The recalled soups were only sold at:

• Malibu Farmers Market, 23555 Civic Center Way, Malibu, CA 90265Sundays, beginning on November 20, 2011

• Autry Farmers Market, 4700 Western Heritage Way, Los Angeles, CA 90027 Saturdays, beginning on May 5, 2012.

Consumers in possession of the recalled products should discard them in the trash. Botulism toxin is odorless and colorless; cooking the soup will not inactivate any toxin that is present.

Botulism is a rare but serious paralytic illness caused by a nerve toxin that is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. The initial symptoms frequently experienced are double or blurred vision, drooping eyelids, and dry or sore throat. Progressive descending paralysis, usually symmetrical, may follow.  Additional symptoms may include slurred speech, difficulty swallowing, inability of the neck muscles to support the head; paralysis of the extremities and respiratory muscles may occur. Infants with botulism appear lethargic, feed poorly, are constipated, have a weak cry, and poor muscle tone. Consumers with any of these symptoms should contact their health care provider.



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May 25th, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 7:01 am

(Audio) The O’Hare Aviation Disaster, 5/25/1979

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NASA: 

Greater Chicago Metropolitan Area

ISS030-E-062540 (2 Feb. 2012) — This nighttime image, photographed by one of the members of the Expedition 30 crew from the International Space Station, features the Greater Chicago Metropolitan Area strung along the southwest shore of Lake Michigan.



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May 25th, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 6:58 am

US Weather: Live!!

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May 25th, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 6:54 am

Pretty rainy in the Caribbean……forget tanning today.

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ZCZC MIATWOAT ALL
TTAA00 KNHC DDHHMM

SPECIAL TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOK
NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL
425 AM EDT FRI MAY 25 2012

FOR THE NORTH ATLANTIC…CARIBBEAN SEA AND THE GULF OF MEXICO…

1. A BROAD AREA OF LOW PRESSURE LOCATED NEAR THE NORTHWESTERN BAHAMAS
IS PRODUCING AN EXTENSIVE AREA OF SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS OVER
THE BAHAMAS AND CUBA.  WHILE THE ORGANIZATION OF THIS SYSTEM HAS NOT
IMPROVED OVER THE PAST FEW HOURS…ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS ARE
EXPECTED TO BECOME MORE CONDUCIVE FOR THE FORMATION OF A
SUBTROPICAL OR TROPICAL CYCLONE BY SATURDAY OR SUNDAY.  THE LOW
SHOULD MOVE TOWARD THE NORTHEAST AT ABOUT 15 MPH DURING THE NEXT
DAY OR SO…FOLLOWED BY A GRADUAL TURN BACK TOWARD THE WEST ON
SATURDAY.  THIS SYSTEM HAS A HIGH CHANCE…70 PERCENT…OF BECOMING
A TROPICAL OR SUBTROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS.

LOCALLY HEAVY RAINFALL…FLOODING…AND GUSTY WINDS ARE POSSIBLE
TODAY OVER PORTIONS OF THE NORTHWESTERN AND CENTRAL BAHAMAS…AS
WELL AS CENTRAL CUBA. INTERESTS ALONG THE SOUTHEASTERN UNITED
STATES COAST SHOULD CLOSELY MONITOR THE PROGRESS OF THIS SYSTEM
OVER THE MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND.  ANOTHER SPECIAL TROPICAL WEATHER
OUTLOOK FOR THIS SYSTEM WILL BE ISSUED LATER TODAY.  FOR ADDITIONAL
INFORMATION ON THIS SYSTEM…PLEASE SEE HIGH SEAS FORECASTS ISSUED
BY THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE…AND PRODUCTS FROM YOUR LOCAL
WEATHER OFFICE.

ELSEWHERE…TROPICAL CYCLONE FORMATION IS NOT EXPECTED DURING THE
NEXT 48 HOURS.

&&

HIGH SEAS FORECASTS ISSUED BY THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE CAN BE
FOUND UNDER AWIPS HEADER NFDHSFAT1 AND WMO HEADER FZNT01 KWBC.

$$
FORECASTER LANDSEA/BRENNAN
NNNN



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May 25th, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 6:51 am

Bud (Cat. 2) to hit shore tonight…..

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000
WTPZ32 KNHC 251144
TCPEP2

BULLETIN
HURRICANE BUD INTERMEDIATE ADVISORY NUMBER 18A
NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL EP022012
500 AM PDT FRI MAY 25 2012

…HURRICANE BUD EXPECTED TO REACH THE COAST OF MEXICO TONIGHT…

SUMMARY OF 500 AM PDT…1200 UTC…INFORMATION
———————————————-
LOCATION…18.0N 105.5W
ABOUT 105 MI…170 KM SW OF MANZANILLO MEXICO
ABOUT 165 MI…270 KM S OF CABO CORRIENTES MEXICO
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS…110 MPH…175 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT…NNE OR 25 DEGREES AT 8 MPH…13 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE…964 MB…28.47 INCHES

WATCHES AND WARNINGS
——————–
CHANGES WITH THIS ADVISORY…

NONE.

SUMMARY OF WATCHES AND WARNINGS IN EFFECT…

A HURRICANE WARNING IS IN EFFECT FOR…
* THE COAST OF MEXICO FROM MANZANILLO NORTHWESTWARD TO CABO
CORRIENTES

A TROPICAL STORM WARNING IS IN EFFECT FOR…
* THE COAST OF MEXICO FROM PUNTA SAN TELMO WESTWARD TO EAST OF
MANZANILLO

A HURRICANE WATCH IS IN EFFECT FOR…
* THE COAST OF MEXICO FROM PUNTA SAN TELMO WESTWARD TO EAST OF
MANZANILLO

A TROPICAL STORM WATCH IS IN EFFECT FOR…
* THE COAST OF MEXICO NORTH OF CABO CORRIENTES TO SAN BLAS

A HURRICANE WARNING MEANS THAT HURRICANE CONDITIONS ARE EXPECTED
SOMEWHERE WITHIN THE WARNING AREA. PREPARATIONS TO PROTECT LIFE AND
PROPERTY SHOULD BE RUSHED TO COMPLETION.

A TROPICAL STORM WARNING MEANS THAT TROPICAL STORM CONDITIONS ARE
EXPECTED SOMEWHERE WITHIN THE WARNING AREA.

A HURRICANE WATCH MEANS THAT HURRICANE CONDITIONS ARE POSSIBLE
WITHIN THE WATCH AREA…IN THIS CASE LATER TODAY.

A TROPICAL STORM WATCH MEANS THAT TROPICAL STORM CONDITIONS ARE
POSSIBLE WITHIN THE WATCH AREA…IN THIS CASE WITHIN 24 TO 36 HOURS.

FOR STORM INFORMATION SPECIFIC TO YOUR AREA…PLEASE MONITOR
PRODUCTS ISSUED BY YOUR NATIONAL METEOROLOGICAL SERVICE.

DISCUSSION AND 48-HOUR OUTLOOK
——————————
AT 500 AM PDT…1200 UTC…THE CENTER OF HURRICANE BUD WAS LOCATED
NEAR LATITUDE 18.0 NORTH…LONGITUDE 105.5 WEST. BUD IS MOVING
TOWARD THE NORTH-NORTHEAST NEAR 8 MPH…13 KM/H. A TURN TOWARD THE
NORTH AND A DECREASE IN FORWARD SPEED ARE EXPECTED DURING THE NEXT
24 TO 36 HOURS…WITH A GRADUAL TURN TO THE WEST ON SUNDAY. ON THE
FORECAST TRACK…THE CENTER OF BUD IS EXPECTED TO MAKE LANDFALL IN
THE HURRICANE WARNING AREA TONIGHT.

MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS ARE NEAR 110 MPH…175 KM/H…
WITH HIGHER GUSTS. BUD IS A CATEGORY TWO HURRICANE ON THE
SAFFIR-SIMPSON HURRICANE WIND SCALE. ALTHOUGH SOME WEAKENING IS
FORECAST TODAY…BUD IS STILL EXPECTED TO REACH THE COAST OF MEXICO
AS A HURRICANE.

HURRICANE-FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD UP TO 35 MILES…55 KM…FROM
THE CENTER…AND TROPICAL-STORM-FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD UP TO 115
MILES…185 KM.

THE ESTIMATED MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE IS 964 MB…28.47 INCHES.

HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND
———————-
WIND…HURRICANE CONDITIONS ARE EXPECTED TO REACH THE COAST WITHIN
THE HURRICANE WARNING AREA THIS AFTERNOON…WITH TROPICAL STORM
CONDITIONS EXPECTED THIS MORNING…MAKING OUTSIDE PREPARATIONS
DIFFICULT OR DANGEROUS. PREPARATIONS TO PROTECT LIFE AND PROPERTY
SHOULD BE RUSHED TO COMPLETION. TROPICAL STORM CONDITIONS ARE
POSSIBLE WITHIN THE TROPICAL STORM WATCH AREA BY TONIGHT.

RAINFALL…BUD IS EXPECTED TO PRODUCE TOTAL RAIN ACCUMULATIONS OF 6
TO 10 INCHES ALONG THE SOUTHWESTERN COAST OF MEXICO IN THE STATES
OF MICHOACAN…COLIMA…JALISCO AND SOUTHERN NAYARIT…WITH
POSSIBLE ISOLATED MAXIMUM AMOUNTS OF 15 INCHES. THESE RAINFALL
AMOUNTS COULD PRODUCE LIFE-THREATENING FLASH FLOODS AND MUDSLIDES.

STORM SURGE…A DANGEROUS STORM SURGE IS EXPECTED TO PRODUCE
SIGNIFICANT COASTAL FLOODING NEAR AND TO THE EAST OF WHERE THE
CENTER OF BUD MAKES LANDFALL. NEAR THE COAST…THE SURGE WILL BE
ACCOMPANIED BY LARGE AND DAMAGING WAVES.

SURF…SWELLS GENERATED BY BUD ARE AFFECTING PORTIONS OF THE
SOUTHERN AND SOUTHWESTERN COASTS OF MEXICO. THESE SWELLS ARE
LIKELY TO CAUSE LIFE-THREATENING SURF AND RIP CURRENT CONDITIONS.

NEXT ADVISORY
————-
NEXT COMPLETE ADVISORY…800 AM PDT.

$$
FORECASTER ROBERTS



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May 25th, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 5:49 am

FEMA: Three Opportunities for Sharing Preparedness this Weekend

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http://blog.fema.gov/2012/05/three-opportunities-for-sharing.html

FEMA Blog

May 24, 2012

Three Opportunities for Sharing Preparedness this Weekend

 
Posted by: Tim Manning, Deputy Administrator, Protection and National Preparedness

Today, I joined our partners at the National Hurricane Center to release the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s outlook for the upcoming Atlantic hurricane season (June 1- November 30). Even though the season “officially” starts next week, we have already seen the first named storm, Alberto, develop in the Atlantic. Alberto serves as an invaluable reminder: as much as we can try to predict, nature and disasters will inevitably throw the unexpected our way.

While we can’t stop a tropical storm, hurricane, earthquake or other natural disaster from happening, there are actions we can all take to lessen the impact these unexpected events can have on our families, homes and businesses. Whatever the risks are in your area (especially those where hurricanes/tropical storms can have an impact), I encourage you to visit Ready.gov to learn about the three simple steps to getting prepared before an emergency. But maybe you already know the risks in your area, have already assembled a family emergency supply kit or recently reviewed your family’s emergency plan – then you can play a part in taking preparedness to the next level. Join us by pledging to prepare for emergencies and telling three of your relatives, friends, coworkers, or social media followers to do so as well.

The upcoming three day weekend could be a great opportunity to practice and share emergency preparedness. Here are a few ideas:

And if you’re looking for more ideas or others ways people and organizations around the country are getting prepared for hurricane season, then you’re in luck. Next week is National Hurricane Preparedness Week, so FEMA and our partners will be talking about hurricane and tropical storm preparedness all week long on our blog, Twitter feed, Facebook page, and other online channels. So make a point to post your own updates about preparing for severe tropical weather, or you can even repost one from our sites!

I hope either of these three – the NOAA hurricane season outlook, upcoming three day weekend, or National Hurricane Preparedness Week – can act as starters for making your family, home, or business more prepared for emergencies as we move into the “official” hurricane season.

 
Posted on5/24/2012 04:06:00 PM


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May 25th, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 5:45 am

Heat Stroke Awareness Day is Today!!!!!!

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May 25th, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 5:43 am

May 25 is Heat Stroke Awareness Day

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May 25th, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 5:35 am

The 2012 Atlantic hurricane season: Will it be good, bad, or……..?

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http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2012/20120524_atlantic_hurricane_season.html

NOAA predicts a near-normal 2012 Atlantic hurricane season

Anniversary of Hurricane Andrew underscores necessity to prepare every year

May 24, 2012

Conditions in the atmosphere and the ocean favor a near-normal hurricane season in the Atlantic Basin this season, NOAA announced today from Miami at its Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, and home to the Hurricane Research Division.

For the entire six-month season, which begins June 1, NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center says there’s a 70 percent chance of nine to 15 named storms (with top winds of 39 mph or higher), of which four to eight will strengthen to a hurricane (with top winds of 74 mph or higher) and of those one to three will become major hurricanes (with top winds of 111 mph or higher, ranking Category 3, 4 or 5). Based on the period 1981-2010, an average season produces 12 named storms with six hurricanes, including three major hurricanes.

“NOAA’s outlook predicts a less active season compared to recent years,” said NOAA Administrator Jane Lubchenco, Ph.D. “But regardless of the outlook, it’s vital for anyone living or vacationing in hurricane-prone locations to be prepared. We have a stark reminder this year with the 20th anniversary of Hurricane Andrew.” Andrew, the Category 5 hurricane that devastated South Florida on August 24, 1992, was the first storm in a late-starting season that produced only six named storms.

Favoring storm development in 2012: the continuation of the overall conditions associated with the Atlantic high-activity era that began in 1995, in addition to near-average sea surface temperatures across much of the tropical Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea, known as the Main Development Region. Two factors now in place that can limit storm development, if they persist, are: strong wind shear, which is hostile to hurricane formation in the Main Development Region, and cooler sea surface temperatures in the far eastern Atlantic.

Hurricane Andrew
August 24, 2012 will be the 20th anniversary of Hurricane Andrew’s devastating landfall in South Florida.Video: Satellite loop of Hurricane Andrew

Download here. (Credit: NOAA.)

“Another potentially competing climate factor would be El Niño if it develops by late summer to early fall. In that case, conditions could be less conducive for hurricane formation and intensification during the peak months (August-October) of the season, possibly shifting the activity toward the lower end of the predicted range,” said Gerry Bell, Ph.D., lead seasonal hurricane forecaster at NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center.

“NOAA’s improvement in monitoring and predicting hurricanes has been remarkable over the decades since Andrew, in large part because of our sustained commitment to research and better technology. But more work remains to unlock the secrets of hurricanes, especially in the area of rapid intensification and weakening of storms,” said Lubchenco. “We’re stepping up to meet this challenge through our Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project, which has already demonstrated exciting early progress toward improving storm intensity forecasts.”

Lubchenco added that more accurate forecasts about a storm’s intensity at landfall and extending the forecast period beyond five days will help America become a more Weather-Ready Nation.

In a more immediate example of research supporting hurricane forecasting, NOAA this season is introducing enhancements to two of the computer models available to hurricane forecasters – the Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting (HWRF) and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) models. The HWRF model has been upgraded with a higher resolution and improved atmospheric physics. This latest version has demonstrated a 20 to 25 percent improvement in track forecasts and a 15 percent improvement in intensity forecasts relative to the previous version while also showing improvement in the representation of storm structure and size. Improvements to the GFDL model for 2012 include physics upgrades that are expected to reduce or eliminate a high bias in the model’s intensity forecasts.

The seasonal outlook does not predict how many storms will hit land. Forecasts for individual storms and their impacts are provided by NOAA’s National Hurricane Center, which continuously monitors the tropics for storm development and tracking throughout the season using an array of tools including satellites, advance computer modeling, hurricane hunter aircraft, and land- and ocean-based observations sources such as radars and buoys.

Next week, May 27- June 2, is national Hurricane Preparedness Week. To help prepare residents of hurricane-prone areas, video and audio public service announcements featuring NOAA hurricane experts and the FEMA administrator are available in both English and Spanish.

“Every hurricane season we ask families, communities, and businesses to ensure they are prepared and visit www.ready.gov/hurricanes,” said Tim Manning, FEMA deputy administrator for protection and national preparedness. “Being prepared includes developing a family emergency plan, putting an emergency kit together or updating your existing kit, keeping important papers and valuables in a safe place, and getting involved to ensure your community is ready.”

NOAA’s outlook for the Eastern Pacific basin is for a near-normal hurricane season and the Central Pacific basin is expected to have a below-normal season. NOAA will issue an updated seasonal outlook for the Atlantic hurricane season in early August, just prior to the historical peak of the season.

NOAA’s mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth’s environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and to conserve and manage our coastal and marine resources. Join us on Facebook, Twitter and our other social media channels.



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