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May 3rd, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP May 3, 2012 @ 8:18 pm

CDC: Tornado coming? Shelter but wear your helmet.

http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2012/s0503_helmets_tornadoes.html

CDC Statement on Helmets and Tornadoes

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention continues to recommend, as its first recommendation, that people in the path of a tornado find a shelter or a tornado-safe room. The safest place in the home is the interior part of a basement. If possible, get under something sturdy such as a heavy table or workbench. If outdoors, lie down in a gully or ditch.

We understand that people who have seen the tragedy that tornadoes can impose are looking for any useful and effective ways to protect themselves. We don’t have research on the effectiveness of helmet use to prevent head injuries during a tornado, but we do know that head injuries are common causes of death during tornadoes, and we have long made the recommendation that people try to protect their heads. Individuals may decide to use helmets to protect their heads. However, because the time to react may be very short, people who choose to use helmets should know where they are and have them readily accessible. Looking for a helmet in the few seconds before a tornado hits may delay you getting safely to shelter. For those who choose to use helmets, these helmets should not be considered an alternative to seeking appropriate shelter. Rather, helmets should be considered just one part of their overall home tornado preparedness kit to avoid any delay.

CDC continues to promote protective measures for use during natural disasters including tornadoes. For more detailed information, go to http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/tornadoes/during.asp.



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May 3rd, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 8:13 pm

Biomarkers and Risk of Clinical and Subclinical Vascular Brain Injury

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Multiple Biomarkers and Risk of Clinical and Subclinical Vascular Brain Injury / Clinical Perspective : The Framingham Offspring Study

http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/125/17/2100.abstract

 

 

Circulation. 2012;125:2100-2107, published online before print March 28 2012, doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.110.989145

In 3127 stroke-free Framingham offspring (age, 59±10 years; 54% female), we related a panel of 8 biomarkers assessing inflammation (C-reactive protein), hemostasis (D-dimer and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1), neurohormonal activity (aldosterone-to-renin ratio, B-type natriuretic peptide, and N-terminal proatrial natriuretic peptides), and endothelial function (homocysteine and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio) measured at the sixth examination (1995–1998) to risk of incident stroke/transient ischemic attack.

In a subset of 1901 participants with available brain magnetic resonance imaging (1999–2005), we further related these biomarkers to total cerebral brain volume, covert brain infarcts, and large white-matter hyperintensity volume. During a median follow-up of 9.2 years, 130 participants experienced incident stroke/transient ischemic attack.

In multivariable analyses adjusted for stroke risk factors, the biomarker panel was associated with incident stroke/transient ischemic attack and with total cerebral brain volume (P<0.05 for both) but not with covert brain infarcts or white-matter hyperintensity volume (P>0.05). In backward elimination analyses, higher log–B-type natriuretic peptide (hazard ratio, 1.39 per 1-SD increment; P=0.002) and log–urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (hazard ratio, 1.31 per 1-SD increment; P=0.004) were associated with increased risk of stroke/transient ischemic attack and improved risk prediction compared with the Framingham Stroke Risk Profile alone; when the <5%, 5% to 15%, or >15% 10-year risk category was used, the net reclassification index was 0.109 (P=0.037). Higher C-reactive protein (β=−0.21 per 1-SD increment; P=0.008), D-dimer (β=−0.18 per 1-SD increment; P=0.041), total homocysteine (β=−0.21 per 1-SD increment; P=0.005), and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (β=−0.15 per 1-SD increment; P=0.042) were associated with lower total cerebral brain volume.

 


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May 3rd, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 8:06 pm

Eight cases of TASER X26 ECD-induced VT/VF

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Zipes DP “Sudden cardiac arrest and death associated with application of shocks from a taser electronic control deviceCirculation 2012; DOI: 10.1161/​CIRCULATIONAHA.112.097584.

ECD (electronic control devices ) stimulation can cause cardiac electrical capture and provoke cardiac arrest due to ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation. After prolonged ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation without resuscitation, asystole develops.



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May 3rd, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 2:53 pm

FEMA: 5/3/12 Briefing

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May 3rd, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 2:17 pm

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Awareness Month — May 2012

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http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6117a10.htm?s_cid=mm6117a10_e

Announcements: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Awareness Month — May 2012

Weekly

May 4, 2012 / 61(17);314

May is Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Awareness Month. ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a progressive, fatal, neurodegenerative disorder of the upper and lower motor neurons. Persons with ALS usually die within 2–5 years of diagnosis.

In October 2010, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) launched the National ALS Registry to collect, manage, and analyze data regarding persons with ALS. The registry uses information provided by registrants with ALS through a secure Internet portal and existing data from national databases, including the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Through the Internet portal, registrants can participate in brief surveys to provide additional information about their illness and possible risk factors so that researchers can gain a better understanding of ALS.

ATSDR is collaborating with the ALS Association, Muscular Dystrophy Association, and other organizations to make all ALS patients and their families aware of the opportunity to register in the National ALS Registry. When sufficient data have been gathered to provide a representative picture of patients with ALS in the United States, ATSDR will begin analyzing the data and providing deidentified data to other researchers.

In addition, ATSDR is undertaking various initiatives to help strengthen the National ALS Registry. These include using selected state and metropolitan area surveillance activities to help evaluate the registry’s completeness, funding a bioregistry feasibility study to link potential specimen data collected (e.g., blood, saliva, and tissue) with existing registry surveys, and developing a system to inform registrants about new research studies and clinical trials. Additional information regarding these initiatives and the National ALS Registry is available at http://www.cdc.gov/als.

 



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May 3rd, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 12:44 am

Dead and wounded continue to pile up in Cairo

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http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-egypt-protests-20120503,0,6756130.story
 
Attack on protesters in Egypt leaves 11 dead
As many as 200 people are hurt in Cairo when unknown assailants attack
demonstrators, including backers of a disqualified Islamist candidate. Other
candidates suspend their campaigns in protest.
By Jeffrey
Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
May 2,
2012, 5:17
p.m.
CAIRO — “At least 11 people were killed Wednesday
when unknown attackers armed with guns and firebombs clashed with protesters
near Egypt’s Defense Ministry in an
escalation of violence highlighting political divisions that threaten the
country ahead of this month’s presidential election.
Assailants stormed about 500 demonstrators at dawn, many of them supporters
of Hazem Salah abu Ismail, an ultraconservative Islamist preacher recently
disqualified from the presidential race. Police did not intervene for hours, and
authorities said as many as 200 people were wounded in the nation’s worst
violence in months…..”


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May 3rd, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 12:42 am

(Audio) Tokyo: Major train catastrophe, 5/3/1962

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Tokyo, Japan

 

ISS026-E-016509 (9 Jan. 2011) — From 220 miles above Earth, one of the
Expedition 26 crew members aboard the International Space Station exposed this
night time picture of the metropolitan area of Tokyo, Japan. The large majority
of the heavily lighted, highly populated area is Tokyo proper. Yokohama is to
the left, below center, along Tokyo Bay



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May 3rd, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 12:38 am

Weather: Live!

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May 3rd, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 12:36 am

Using volunteer interpreters during the 2010 Haiti earthquake

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The use of volunteer interpreters during the 2010 Haiti earthquake: Lessons learned from the USNS COMFORT Operation Unified Response Haiti

Am J Disast Med
Clydette Powell, MD, MPH, FAAP; Claire Pagliara-Miller, RN, PhD
Winter 2012; pages 37-47
 This article explores key lessons learned in the use of volunteer interpreters in earthquake disaster relief in Haiti and highlights the approaches that optimize volunteer services in such a setting, and which may be applicable in similar future events.


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May 3rd, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 12:34 am

When the Israelis helped out in Fukushima…..

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Global responsibility in mass casualty events: The Israeli experience in Japan

Am J Disast Med
Ofer Merin, MD; Nehemia Blumberg, MD; David Raveh, MD; Ariel Bar, MD; Masafumi Nishizawa, MD; Ophir Cohen-Marom, MD
Winter 2012; pages 61-64

 

“…. Following major disasters, even highly modernized countries will face an urgent surge in the need of medical resources. These situations emphasize the need for global responsibility to provide assistance.
Key words: earthquake, tsunami, mass disaster, humanitarian aid DOI:10.5055/ajdm.2011.0081″


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