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April 25th, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP April 25, 2012 @ 9:47 am

FEMA Briefing of 4/25/12

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April 25th, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 4:56 am

World Malaria Day — April 25, 2012

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http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6115a7.htm?s_cid=mm6115a7_e

Announcements: World Malaria Day — April 25, 2012

Weekly

April 20, 2012 / 61(15);278

World Malaria Day is commemorated on April 25, the date in 2000 when 44 African leaders met in Abuja, Nigeria, and committed their countries to cutting malaria-related deaths in half by 2010. In the decade since, increased funding and control efforts have led to a scale-up of effective malaria interventions, resulting in decreased malaria morbidity and mortality in many countries. In 2010, an estimated 216 million cases of malaria and 655,000 deaths were reported worldwide, a 17% decrease in malaria incidence and 25% reduction in global malaria mortality since 2000 (1). World Malaria Day 2012′s theme, Sustain Gains, Save Lives: Invest in Malaria, underscores the need to consolidate these gains and continue scaling up malaria interventions.

CDC supports these efforts through the President’s Malaria Initiative, a U.S. government interagency initiative to reduce malaria incidence and mortality in 19 countries in sub-Saharan Africa and in the Mekong subregion in Asia. In addition, CDC conducts multidisciplinary strategic and applied research globally to increase knowledge about malaria and develop safe, effective interventions that can lead to the elimination and eventual eradication of malaria.

As a World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Center for Prevention and Control of Malaria, CDC works closely with WHO, which has just released new malaria surveillance manuals and launched the T3: Test, Treat, and Track initiative, urging increased investment in national capacity for diagnostic testing, diagnosis-based treatment, and surveillance. Additional information is available from WHO at http://www.who.int/malaria/enExternal Web Site Icon. Additional information regarding CDC’s malaria activities is available at http://www.cdc.gov/malaria.

Reference

  1. World Health Organization. World malaria report 2011. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization; 2011. Available at http://www.who.int/malaria/world_malaria_report_2011/en/index.htmlExternal Web Site Icon. Accessed April 10, 2012.


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April 25th, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 4:42 am

Impact of antiviral treatment & H1N1

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Chowell G, Viboud C, Simonsen L, et al. Impact of antiviral treatment and hospital admission delay on risk of death associated with 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic influenza in Mexico. BMC Infect Dis 2012 Apr 20 (Early online publication) [Full text]

Approximately 50% of all A/H1N1-positive patients received antiviral medication during the Spring and Summer 2009 pandemic waves in Mexico while only 9% of A/H1N1 cases received antiviral medications during the fall wave (P < 0.0001). After adjustment for age, gender, and geography, antiviral treatment significantly reduced the risk of death (OR = 0.52 (95% CI: 0.30, 0.90)) while longer hospital admission delays increased the risk of death by 2.8-fold (95% CI: 2.25, 3.41).



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April 25th, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 12:07 am

(Audio) Major Aviation Disaster: The Canary Islands, April 25, 1977

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April 25th, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 12:06 am

WHO: On global measles

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http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs286/en/index.html

Key facts



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April 25th, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 12:06 am

Preventive treatment of migraine headache

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Silberstein S, et al                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  “Evidence-based guideline update — pharmacologic treatment for episodic migraine prevention in adults: Report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the American Headache Society

Neurology 2012; 78: 1337-45.

http://www.neurology.org/content/78/17/1337.abstract

The author panel reviewed 284 abstracts, which ultimately yielded 29 Class I or Class II articles that are reviewed herein. Divalproex sodium, sodium valproate, topiramate, metoprolol, propranolol, and timolol are effective for migraine prevention and should be offered to patients with migraine to reduce migraine attack frequency and severity (Level A). Frovatriptan is effective for prevention of menstrual migraine (Level A). Lamotrigine is ineffective for migraine prevention (Level A).


Holland S, et al                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        “Evidence-based guideline update — NSAIDs and other complementary treatments for episodic migraine prevention in adults: Report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the American Headache Society”

Neurology 2012; 78:1346-53.

http://www.neurology.org/content/78/17/1346.abstract

 Petasites (butterbur) is effective for migraine prevention and should be offered to patients with migraine to reduce the frequency and severity of migraine attacks (Level A). Fenoprofen, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen, naproxen sodium, MIG-99 (feverfew), magnesium, riboflavin, and subcutaneous histamine are probably effective for migraine prevention (Level B). Treatments considered possibly effective are cyproheptadine, Co-Q10, estrogen, mefenamic acid, and flurbiprofen (Level C). Data are conflicting or inadequate to support or refute use of aspirin, indomethacin, omega-3, or hyperbaric oxygen for migraine prevention. Montelukast is established as probably ineffective for migraine prevention (Level B).

 


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April 25th, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 12:02 am

US Weather in Motion

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