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March 11th, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP March 11, 2012 @ 7:39 am

The Madrid Train Bombings of 3/11/2004

History.com

“….191 people are killed and nearly 2,000 are injured when 10 bombs explode on four trains in three Madrid-area train stations during a busy morning rush hour. The bombs were later found to have been detonated by mobile phones.
The attacks, the deadliest against civilians on European soil since the 1988 Lockerbie airplane bombing, were…..the work of…… an extreme Islamist militant group loosely tied to, but thought to be working in the name of, al-Qaida…..”



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March 11th, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 7:01 am

3/11/2010: Fukushima

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CNN, 3/11/12:  “Japan pauses for a moment of silence to mark one year since a
massive earthquake and tsunami killed thousands and triggered a
nuclear crisis.”

Link:   http://edition.cnn.com/2012/03/11/world/asia/japan-quake-anniversary/index.html

NASA



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March 11th, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 6:45 am

(Audio) “and the events one year ago today…….”

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Earthquake and Tsunami near Sendai, Japan

On March 11, 2011, at 2:46 p.m. local time (05:46 Universal Time, or UTC), a magnitude 8.9 earthquake struck off the east coast of Japan, at 38.3 degrees North latitude and 142.4 degrees East longitude. The epicenter was 130 kilometers (80 miles) east of Sendai, and 373 kilometers (231 miles) northeast of Tokyo. If the initial measurements are confirmed, it will be the world’s fifth largest earthquake since 1900.

This map shows the location of the March 11 earthquake, as well as the foreshocks (dotted lines) and aftershocks (solid lines). The size of each circle represents the magnitude of the associated quake or shock. The map also includes land elevation data from NASA’s Shuttle Radar Topography Mission and ocean bathymetry data from the British Oceanographic Data Center.

According to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the earthquake occurred at a depth of 24.4 kilometers (15.2 miles) beneath the seafloor. The March 11 earthquake was preceded by a series of large foreshocks on March 9, including an M7.2 event. USGS reported that the earthquakes “occurred as a result of thrust faulting on or near the subduction zone interface plate boundary.”

The March 11 quake sent tsunami waves rushing into the coast of Japan and rippling out across the entire Pacific basin. Crescent-shaped coasts and harbors, such as those near Sendai, can play a role in focusing the waves as they approach the shore. Also, the land elevation is low and flat along much of the Japanese coast west and south of the earthquake epicenter, leaving many areas particularly vulnerable to tsunamis.

The Japan Meteorological Agency reported maximum tsunami heights of 4.1 meters at Kamaishi at 3:21 p.m. (06:21 UTC), 7.3 meters at 3:50 p.m. (06:50 UTC) at the Soma station, and 4.2 meters at 4:52 p.m. (07:52 UTC) at Oarai.

The U.S. Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) reported a wave with maximum height of 2.79 meters (9.2 feet) at an observing station at Hanasaki, Hokkaido, at 3:57 p.m. local time (06:57 UTC). Other PTWC reports of tsunami waves include:

1.27 meters (4.2 feet) at 10:48 UTC at Midway Island
1.74 meters (5.7 feet) at 13:72 UTC at Kahului, Maui, Hawaii
1.41 meters (4.6 feet) at 14:09 UTC at Hilo, Hawaii
0.69 meters (2.3 feet) at 15:42 UTC in Vanuatu
1.88 meters (6.2 feet) at 16:54 UTC at Port San Luis, California
2.02 meters (6.6 feet) at 16:57 UTC at Crescent City, California

NASA Earth Observatory image created by Robert Simmon and Jesse Allen, using earthquake and plate tectonics data from the USGS Earthquake Hazard Program, land elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) provided by the University of Maryland’s Global Land Cover Facility, and ocean bathymetry data from the British Oceanographic Data Center’s Global Bathmetric Chart of the Oceans (GEBCO). Caption by Michael Carlowicz.



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March 11th, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 6:43 am

(Audio) A look back to last year in Japan…..

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March 11th, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 12:08 am

(Audio) An historical look at earthquakes

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March 11th, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 12:05 am

(Audio) A talk on tectonics as we remember Fukushima

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March 11th, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 12:01 am

Ground Water Awareness Week — March 11–17, 2012

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http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6109a5.htm?s_cid=mm6109a5_e

Announcements: Ground Water Awareness Week — March 11–17, 2012

Weekly

March 9, 2012 / 61(09);163

CDC is collaborating with the National Ground Water Association to highlight National Ground Water Awareness Week, March 11–17, 2012. Water is essential for life. However, many persons are not aware that much of the water they use flows from below ground to the surface, where it is used by public water systems and private wells. The National Ground Water Association uses this week to stress ground water’s importance to the health and well-being of humans and the environment (1).

The majority of public water systems in the United States use ground water as their primary source, providing drinking water to almost 90 million persons (2). An additional 15 million U.S. homes use private wells, which also rely on ground water (3).

Usually, ground water in the United States is safe to use. However, ground water sources can be contaminated naturally or as a result of imperfect agricultural, manufacturing, or sanitary practices. The presence of contaminants such as pesticides, factory waste, and sewage can lead to acute and chronic illness (4).

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has worked with individual states to develop new regulations to provide increased protection against microbial pathogens in public water systems that use ground water sources (5). Private ground water wells (serving fewer than 25 persons) might not be regulated but nonetheless must be properly maintained by well owners to ensure that the water remains free from harmful chemicals and pathogens.* Resources are available from state and local health departments to help homeowners protect their ground water.†

References

  1. National Ground Water Association. National Ground Water Awareness Week: March 11–17, 2012. Westerville, OH: National Ground Water Association; 2012. Available at http://www.ngwa.org/events-education/awareness/pages/default.aspxExternal Web Site Icon. Accessed March 7, 2012.
  2. US Environmental Protection Agency. Factoids: drinking water and ground water statistics for 2009. Washington, DC: US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water; 2009. Available at http://www.epa.gov/ogwdw/databases/pdfs/data_factoids_2009.pdf Adobe PDF fileExternal Web Site Icon. Accessed March 7, 2012.
  3. US Census Bureau. Current housing reports: American housing survey for the United States: 2009. Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office; 2011. Available at http://www.census.gov/prod/2011pubs/h150-09.pdf Adobe PDF fileExternal Web Site Icon. Accessed March 7, 2012.
  4. US Environmental Protection Agency. Drinking water contaminants. Washington, DC: US Environmental Protection Agency; 2012. Available at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/contaminants/index.htmlExternal Web Site Icon. Accessed March 7, 2012.
  5. US Environmental Protection Agency. Ground water rule (GWR). Washington, DC: US Environmental Protection Agency; 2012. Available at http://water.epa.gov/lawsregs/rulesregs/sdwa/gwr/index.cfmExternal Web Site Icon. Accessed March 7, 2012.

 

 


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March 11th, 2012 posted by Paul Rega, MD, FACEP @ 12:00 am

CDC: Prevalence of Obesity Among Persons Aged 12–19 Years, by Race/Ethnicity and Sex

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http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6109a7.htm?s_cid=mm6109a7_e

QuickStats: Prevalence of Obesity* Among Persons Aged 12–19 Years, by Race/Ethnicity and Sex — National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, United States, 2009–2010

Weekly

March 9, 2012 / 61(09);165

 Obesity defined as body mass index (weight [kg] / height [m]2) ≥95th sex- and age-specific percentile from the 2000 CDC growth charts.

† 95% confidence interval.

During 2009–2010, 19.6% of males and 17.1% of females aged 12–19 years were obese. More than one quarter (26.5%) of Hispanic males were obese, compared with 22.6% of non-Hispanic black males and 17.5% of non-Hispanic white males. Prevalence of obesity was higher among non-Hispanic black females (24.8%) than among non-Hispanic white females (14.7%); 19.8% of Hispanic females were obese.

Sources: Ogden CL, Carroll MD, Kit BK, Flegal KM. Prevalence of obesity in the United States, 2009–2010. NCHS data brief no. 82. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics; 2012.

Ogden CL, Carroll MD, Kit BK, Flegal KM. Prevalence of obesity and trends in body mass index among US children and adolescents, 1999–2010. JAMA 2012;307:483–90.

National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009–2010. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes.htm.

Alternate Text: The figure above shows the prevalence of obesity among persons aged 12-19 years, by race/ethnicity and sex in the United States during 2009-2010, according to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. During 2009-2010, 19.6% of males and 17.1% of females aged 12-19 years were obese. More than one quarter (26.5%) of Hispanic males were obese, compared with 22.6% of non-Hispanic black males and 17.5% of non-Hispanic white males. Prevalence of obesity was higher among non-Hispanic black females (24.8%) than among non-Hispanic white females (14.7%); 19.8% of Hispanic females were obese.



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